Chief Scout's Award Graphic

 

 

15th Burlington Group Information

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The Chief Scout's Award

 

Chief Scout's Award Crest

 

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Chief Scout's Award Graphic

15th BURLINGTON / STRATHCONA
 and East Burlington Scout Troops

Pathfinder Scouts, Holders of the Chief Scout's Award

Honour Roll

Chief Scout's Award Graphic

PICK A YEAR
1977 | 1979 | 1980 | 1981 | 1983 | 1988 | 1989 | 1996  /

  1999 | 2001 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 /

2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013

1977 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu

Chief Scout's Award Presentation - 1976
Kevin B.

Chief Scout's Award Graphic

Wayne B. (no picture)

1979 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu

Mike S., 1979 (Scout in front)
Mike S. (Scout in front)

1980 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu

Stephen S., 1979
Stephen S. (front row, first Scout from R)

1981 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu

15th's 3 "Chief Scouts" - 1981
Vivek R., Joe J., Reid M.

1983 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu

Chief Scout's Award Presentation - 1983
William K.

1988 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu

Lloyd B, 1988
Lloyd B.

1989 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu

Mike G., 1989
Michael G.

1996 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu

Chief Scout's Award Graphic

Michael T. (no picture)

Chief Scout's Award Presentation - 1996
Jason V.

1999 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu

Matt W., 1999
Matt W.

2001 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu

William B., 2001
William B.

2003 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu

Jeff D., 2003
Jeff D.

Scott H., 2003
Scott H. (10th Burlington)

2004 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu

John G., 2004
John G. (2nd Strathcona)

2005 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu 

Alex S. (2nd Strathcona)

Sean W. (2nd Strathcona)
Sean W. (2nd Strathcona)


James (J.J.) M. (2nd Strathcona)

Mark H. (10th Burlington)
Mark H.
(10th Burlington)

Kevin D., 2005
Kevin D. (10th Burlington)

2006 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu 
Britt I. (6th Burlington)
Brittannie I. (6th Burlington)

Max P. (2nd Strathcona)
Max P. (2nd Strathcona)

2007 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu 
Jack B., 2007
Jack B.

Simon H., 2007
Simon H. (6th Burlington)

2008 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu 
Sarah K., 2008
Sarah K.
2009 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu 
Dan H., 2009
Dan H. (6th Burlington)
Nicole R., 2009
Nicole R. (27th Orchard)
2010 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu 
Bailey T., 2010
Bailey T.
2011 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu 
Kevin G., 2011
Kevin G.
2012 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu 
Daniel H., 2012
Daniel H. (6th Burlington)
2013 Back to Chief Scout's Award Menu 

Calum A., 2013
Calum A.

Matthew D., 2013
Matthew D. (27th Orchard)

Christian M., 2013
Christian M. (1st Carlisle)

The 15th Burlington/Strathcona and East Burlington Troops are proud of these youth who, over the years, have achieved the Scout program's highest honour. The list was compiled from the records of the Burlington Area.


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About the Chief Scout's Award

Chief Scout's Award Crest

On September 18, 1973, Roland Michener, then Governor General and the Chief Scout of Canada, inaugurated the Chief Scout's Award.  In his challenge, the Chief Scout said that Scouts who receive the award will have exemplified Scouting's principles through leadership, voluntary service to the community, and outdoor skills.  These elements provide the award's focus.

The obligation of every Scouting program is to offer every participant in the Troop the chance to achieve the Chief Scout's Award. However, participation in the Troop does not guarantee the automatic presentation of this level's highest achievement. A recipient of the Chief Scout's Award has demonstrated the personal desire to reach a little farther, to work a little harder and to put even more back into the community.

A holder of the Chief Scout's Award has earned the highest achievement level of the Scouting program, the Pathfinder Award. In addition, there are several more tasks to be accomplished before this final step is acknowledged. By the time a Scout is ready to qualify for the Chief Scout's Award, they have performed over 30 hours of service in the community, many of it self-directed. They have met with a local service agency and together have discussed and made plans for future improvements in the community. Additional work on the World Conservation Badge exposes a Chief Scout Candidate to the many environmental issues of today, and they have taken an active role in promoting those issues with the public.

Chief Scout candidates amass more than 100 kilometers in hiking camps and they spend time as trainers helping their fellow Scouts work on their own badge levels.

Having done all of that, the recipient of a Chief Scout's Award must submit their work for judgment by their fellow Scouts, their Troop Scouter, and their Patrol Counsellors.

Canadian Chief Scout's Award recipients have gone on to travel in space, and become political leaders.  Some have been recognized worldwide as authors and scientists.

-adapted from information from the 1991 Scout Leader's Handbook, and from London District Council

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Current Requirements for Chief Scout's Award

  • Have earned the Pathfinder award.
  • Be currently qualified in Standard First Aid.
  • Have earned at least one challenge badge in each of the 7 Challenge Badge Categories: Athletics, Outdoors, Science & Technology, Home & Family, Personal Development, Culture & Society, Personal Fitness.
  • Hold the World Conservation badge / World Scout Environment Award..
  • Investigate Scouts Canada's involvement in World Scouting. Present your findings in an interesting way to your Patrol, Troop, or other group. Your presentation should include information on the following:
    • a)Scouts Canada's involvement with:
      • The Canadian Scout Brotherhood Fund
      • World Jamborees
      • The World Organization of the Scout Movement (WOSM)
    • b)The purpose and location of the World Scouting Bureau
    • c)The current World Scouting membership and how Canada's membership compares to that of other countries.
  • Develop yourself further in each Activity Area by:
    • a)Designing a challenging program with a Scouter which includes the requirement to excel in a component of each Activity Area (Citizenship, Leadership, Personal Development, and Outdoor Skills). Citizenship must include providing at least 30 hours of leadership to others. These hours are in addition to the hours required for the Citizenship Activity Area. If at all possible, provide this service outside of Scouting.
    • b)Offering your plans and goals for discussion and approval to your Court of Honour and Troop Scouter prior to beginning.
    • c)Reporting to and being evaluated by the Court of Honour and Troop Scouter on your ongoing progress.

 

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E-Mail Scouts@15thstrathcona.scouter.ca

This page, and all contents, Copyright 1998 - 2013 Scouts Canada, 15th Strathcona Scouting Group
Select graphics courtesy of the Web Diner.

Page last revised Monday June 10, 2013.